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AC Repair in St. George, SC

AC Repair St. George, SC

There's nothing quite like a South Carolina summer. On any given day, you can enjoy lazy days near the beaches in St. George, memorable outdoor activities with friends, and barbeque sessions that last well into the evening. While South Carolina is known for its beauty, outdoor temperatures begin to heat up in April and, by July, can reach over 100 degrees.

Having a reliable air conditioning system to keep your family cool and comfortable in the summer is a must. Unfortunately, AC systems often require repairs when you need them most. In these situations, you need AC repair in St. George, SC, as soon as possible. That's where Atlantis Heating & Air swoops in to save the day with efficient service, effective repairs, and outstanding customer service.

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The Atlantis Heating & Air Difference

When your A/C unit needs repairing, you're probably looking for a trustworthy company with highly-trained technicians, cost-conscious pricing, and unwavering commitment to you - the client.

As a family-operated AC repair company in South Carolina, Atlantis Heating & Air provides that and more. Our highest priority is to do what's best for our customers - no questions asked. By giving our clients honest evaluations, reasonable pricing, and access to AC repair experts, we gain customers for life. We find this approach to be much better than recommending unneeded repairs, charging outrageous prices, or constantly trying to sell you a product.

 Appliance Store St. George, SC

At the end of the day, our goal is to make it simple to live comfortably in your home, no matter the month. To achieve that goal, we provide a wide range of A/C repair services:

  • AC Refrigerant Leaks
  • Failed Blower Motor Repair
  • AC Capacitor Repair
  • Clogged Drain Line Repair
  • AC Compressor Repair
  • Evaporator Coil Repair
  • Condenser Coil Repair
  • Clogged or Dirty AC Filter Replacement
  • Much More

What are the Signs You Need AC Repair in St. George, SC?

While modern AC units are built to withstand outdoor conditions and years of everyday use, like most machines, repairs are needed eventually. According to a recent poll conducted by Consumer Affairs, air conditioning was reported as the second-most needed home repair in the U.S., just after plumbing systems.

To keep your AC system going strong and to minimize major repairs and HVAC replacements, keep an eye on the following signs.

AC Cycles

Never-Ending AC Cycles

Your AC unit's cooling cycles should come on at relatively routine times. Sure, you can expect your A/C to kick on more often during the hottest months of the year. But if you find that it's cycling on and off all the time, something is probably wrong. If you hear frequent cycles, contact Atlantis today so our team can diagnose your problem. Routine maintenance or a simple AC tune-up may be all you need.

Water Leakage

Water Leakage from AC Unit

When warm air blows over your unit's evaporator coil, it cools down and forms condensation, which you often see on the ground around your unit. This is normal. However, if your condensation drain line is damaged or broken, it can lead to serious water leaks that must be dealt with professionally.

Room Temperatures

Different Room Temperatures

To keep the temperatures in your home uniform, keep your vents open, unobstructed, and clean. Be forewarned, though - if the insulation in your home is poor or you have ductwork in disrepair, opening vents probably won't help much. If you find that to be the case, call Atlantis Heating & Air ASAP so we can get to the bottom of your temperature fluctuations.

Nasty Odors

Nasty Odors

If you smell unpleasant odors and think they are coming from your air conditioning unit, you need to fix the problem before it gets worse. Fortunately, a quick diagnostic test from a professional can tell if your air conditioning system requires a complete tune-up, replacement, and cleaning or if your cooling system needs a further technical overhaul. Ultraviolet (UV) lights can do wonders for killing microbial growth in air conditioning systems. Contact Atlantis Heating & Air to learn more about how our AC experts can eliminate gross odors with AC repair in St. George, SC.

Warm Air

Warm Air Instead of Cold

Have you ever been sitting in your living room during a hot South Carolina summer and noticed that your air return vents are pumping out hot air? You aren't alone - this is a common problem that Atlantis AC technicians have seen a thousand times. Despite our experience, we know that these instances can vary. Sometimes, an air filter chance is all you need to remediate the problem. In other circumstances, warm air blowing instead of cold can be a more complex issue. Our team of highly-trained technicians has the tools and repair strategies needed to diagnose and repair these problems, so a replacement isn't needed.

Freezes Over

AC Unit Freezes Over

Have you noticed that your AC unit's evaporator coil is freezing over during the summer months? This is most often caused by low refrigerant levels, a clogged filter, or poor airflow. Regardless of the cause, Atlantis Heating & Air has a cost-conscious solution to frozen evaporator coils.

phone-number843-761-0111

Atlantis Heating & Air Pro Tip

If your evaporator coils aren't clean, take some time to clean them. Your coils won't transfer heat correctly when covered with debris and dirt. Dirty coils can lead to all kinds of problems, from higher energy consumption to the system overheating and the compressor failing.

Are These AC Unit Noises Normal?

It doesn't have to be the Halloween season to hear scary sounds coming out of your home's AC unit. If your air conditioner seems like it's possessed, chances are it's trying to tell you it might need maintenance or repair. Keep your ears perked for these common noises that may mean you need AC repair in St. George, SC.

Hissing Noises

If you hear a hissing noise coming from your AC unit, it's probably not coming from a rattlesnake. Most likely, the hissing you're hearing is due to an AC leak. Though usually small, AC leaks can lead to many costly problems that ultimately shorten the lifespan of your HVAC unit. If left unchecked, a leak may lead to full AC replacement. Rather than going that route, contact Atlantis Heating & Air for an inspection. Our technicians will thoroughly examine your unit to spot the leak and make the necessary repairs, so you can carry on with your life.

Banging Noises

Banging noises coming from your AC unit can be disconcerting. If you hear banging noises, you're right to be worried - these sounds can mean a few things, but the typical culprit is a loose spring, screw, or bolt within your unit. In other, more unfortunate circumstances, these noises could mean you're dealing with a broken AC blower or motor. To find out what's going on, it's always best to work with a certified, licensed professional specializing in air conditioning repair.

Screeching Noises

A screeching or high-pitched squealing noise can be downright scary in the middle of the night. If you hear this noise in the summertime, though, chances are it's your AC unit telling you the fan belt is worn out or loose. Alternatively, this noise could mean you have a broken or malfunctioning motor.

What Do I Do If My AC Unit Won't Turn On?

When hot summer temperatures are in full swing in South Carolina, most residents turn to their air conditioners to cool down and relax. Could you imagine coming home from a hard day's work in the middle of July, only to find your house is hotter inside than it is outside? When your A/C unit doesn't turn on, it's not just a matter of sweaty inconvenience - it's a matter of health and safety. Without reliable cool air to keep your house comfortable, you could suffer from heat exhaustion or worse.

So, if your air conditioning unit won't turn on, what should you do? Consider these helpful troubleshooting tricks:

  • Ensure Your Thermostat is on Cool
  • Check Your Circuit Breaker Panel for Trips
  • Check Your System's Power Switches
  • See if Air Filter is Dirty or Clogged
  • Remove Any Dirt and Debris from Outside

Have you tried these tips and tricks with little or no success? It might be time to bring in the pros. contacting a trustworthy HVAC maintenance company like Atlantis for AC repair in St. George, SC, is often the quickest and most effective way to fix a malfunctioning air conditioner.

 Appliance Repair Store St. George, SC

Try These Tips to Save Money and Energy

Summers in South Carolina mean rising temperatures and, by proxy, higher electric bills. If you're like us, you don't want to pay any more than you have to. Fortunately, at Atlantis Heating & Air, we know a thing or two about saving energy. Try these easy tips and tricks to save money and energy this summer.

Protect Your AC Unit

While your HVAC unit is built to be outside, constant sun exposure shortens its lifespan and ability to function optimally. Consider installing an awning or planting a tree or bush near your unit to give it shade from the sun. Keep in mind, though, that trees and bushes shed leaves and other debris that can clog your unit. Be sure to select a bush or tree that doesn't shed much.

Invest in a Programmable Thermostat

Programmable thermostats give you complete control of your HVAC unit, even when you're not home. This allows you to set a schedule that accounts for your usage habits to reduce unnecessary AC power use. For example, if the whole family is away from home all day, your thermostat raises the temperature and only starts to lower it when people get home. You can save a lot of energy by not turning on the AC power when no one is in the house.

Think About Replacing Your Unit

At first glance, the cost of replacing an A/C system might seem incredibly expensive. However, if your hardware is older, the ROI you get on a new unit may happen quicker than you think.

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How Do I Know When It's Time to Replace My AC Unit?

Your HVAC system is one of the most expensive and important appliances in your house, so it's important to make sure it's running well. A poorly functioning HVAC system can drive up utility costs and cause you to spend money on repairs. While minor repairs are commonplace, it's wise to think about how often your unit needs repairs and how serious they seem. If AC repair in St. George, SC, has run its course, it may be time to replace your AC unit. Here are some of the most common signs that it's time to do so.

Your AC System Runs Longer and More Often

An old and exhausted system takes longer to reach the intended temperature because it has to work harder than a new system. After several years of use, coils and motors can no longer operate at full capacity. They often take longer to produce desired temperatures and may not be able to circulate air as efficiently or effectively. Occasionally, replacing individual parts may extend the system's life; however, if you notice difficulty reaching certain temperatures or an increase in running time, it may be time to replace the system entirely.

You're Paying for Frequent Repairs or Replacements

No matter the quality or how much you pay for your A/C unit, it's going to need maintenance and repairs from time to time. The parts that make up your HVAC system - coils, filters, motors, and fans - can be worn or damaged, which affects your AC system's efficiency. While this is natural for air conditioning systems, needing frequent repairs is a red flag. If repairs and replacements are becoming more frequent, it's often a sign that it would make more financial sense to replace the entire system.

Your AC Unit is Old

If your AC system is more than 10 years old, the technology is likely outdated and far less efficient than modern equipment. Also, after 10 years, most older equipment starts to lose efficiency and have performance issues. Even a well-maintained system wears out after a decade or more of ongoing use. If your system is just too old to perform like it used to, a newer, more efficient heating and cooling system makes sense to consider.

 Appliances St. George, SC

Atlantis Heating & Air Pro Tip

Regardless of the type or brand of cooling system you have in your home, proper maintenance is essential for operation and efficiency. Make sure each unit is cleaned regularly, worn parts are replaced, and your system is checked annually by a professional. This can greatly help save costs and extend the life of the system.

Free Consultation

Choose Atlantis Heating & Air for Unmatched AC Repair in St. George, SC

When you need a reliable AC repair company that offers high-quality service at a price you can afford, nobody is better suited to serve you than Atlantis Heating & Air. From simple A/C system checks to evaporator coil replacements and everything in between, your comfort and peace of mind is our bread and butter. No tricky fine print. No unnecessary services. Only exceptional A/C repair for your family. Contact our office today to learn more about our company or to schedule a quick and easy evaluation today.

phone-number843-761-0111

Latest News in St. George, SC

Proposed plan to rezone 360 acres to industrial land raises community concerns

A developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land.ST. GEORGE, S.C. (WCSC) - Calling one place home all your life until a rezoning request sign pops up on your street. That is what happened to a group of people who live in St. George.One developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land that would affect large properties off Highway 78 one mile east of St. George.Although Dorchester County’s plans do not say what exactly will be ...

A developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land.

ST. GEORGE, S.C. (WCSC) - Calling one place home all your life until a rezoning request sign pops up on your street. That is what happened to a group of people who live in St. George.

One developer is requesting to change more than 360 acres of residential land to industrial land that would affect large properties off Highway 78 one mile east of St. George.

Although Dorchester County’s plans do not say what exactly will be built in this area, a number of residents who have spent their whole lives here say they want their land to be kept the way they’ve always known it to be.

Richard Myers was born on Sugar Hill Road in St. George and has lived here all his life.

“Everybody seems to know that something big is going to happen in this area except the people that live here,” Myers said.

He owns around 37 acres, which has the possibility of turning into industrial land.

“All of this that we’re standing on now used to be our farm, but as the years changed... the farm got smaller,” Myers said. “But we still got a farm, and we want to keep it that way. We don’t want a factory sitting in the middle of it or a warehouse.”

Another resident in the area, Barbara Felder, is the sixth generation in her family to live here. Her grandparents and aunt’s home is still on the land.

She was asked what her reaction was when she first saw the Dorchester County rezoning sign down the street.

“We were shocked,” Felder said. “There were no letters or no communication about the changes in our area.”

Felder says she worries about how this rezoning could affect pollution, their roads and access to emergency vehicles.

“We shouldn’t let the county nor the developer to come in our community and tell us what to do as taxpayers and for our future,” Felder said.

Myers says he has no intention of selling his land but knows his taxes will rise if he doesn’t.

“If they want your property, they’re going to get it because they’re going to run your taxes sky high until you say, ‘Enough,’” Myers said. “‘I got to sell it because I can’t pay the taxes.’”

Both of them say they want to be involved with the rezoning process.

“We are tired of explaining and they need to change and not think about the almighty dollar that’s coming into Dorchester County area,” Felder said.

Dorchester County did not respond for a comment because Monday was a holiday. This rezoning still has to go through three readings before it can be approved.

To take a closer look at the official rezoning plan from the county, click here.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

US Department of Labor recovers $77K in back wages, damages for 17 employees after Saint George restaurant failed to pay for all hours worked

Employer: Armando’s Mexican Restaurant LLCInvestigation site: 5792 Memorial Blvd. Saint George, South Carolina 29477Investigation findings: Investigators with the department’s Wage and Hour Division found that the employer allowed some employees to work off-the-clock without compensation, a violation of the Fa...

Employer: Armando’s Mexican Restaurant LLC

Investigation site: 5792 Memorial Blvd. Saint George, South Carolina 29477

Investigation findings: Investigators with the department’s Wage and Hour Division found that the employer allowed some employees to work off-the-clock without compensation, a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Employees performed work when they reported to work before their scheduled shift time or stayed after their shift ended. In addition, Armando’s paid a fixed salary to some employees, failing to pay an overtime premium for all hours over 40 in a workweek. Investigators also determined the employer failed to keep complete and accurate records of the number of hours worked by employees.

Back Wages and Liquidated Damages Recovered: $38,610 for 17 workers and an equal amount in liquidated damages.

Quote: “Restaurant workers are some of the community’s lowest-paid workers. When employers fail to pay these workers all of their legally earned wages, workers and their families find it harder to make ends meet. Illegally withholding wages also give employers an unfair advantage over their law-abiding competitors,” said Wage and Hour District Director Jamie Benefiel in Columbia, South Carolina. “The Wage and Hour Division is able to provide resources to both employers and employees to help understand their responsibilities and rights under the law.”

Background: Employers can contact the Wage and Hour Division at its toll-free number, 1-866-4-US-WAGE. The division also offers numerous online resources for employers, such as a fact sheet on Fair Labor Standards Act wage laws overtime requirements. Workers who feel they may not be getting the wages they earned may contact a Wage and Hour Division representative in their state through a list and interactive online map on the agency’s website. Workers and employers alike can help ensure hours worked and pay are accurate by downloading the department’s Android Timesheet App for free.

Learn more about Wage and Hour Division.

Rosenwald students recall struggles and hope at reopening of St. George school

An historic school built for African Americans in 1925 is restored and reopened in St. George, S.C. as a community center and museum. It will share the stories of those who created it and were educated there. Painted bright white with a red, tin roof, the St. George Rosenwald school in Dorchester County looks new. Inside, former student Clara Britt is excited to sit behind a small, wooden desk again.“I never thought that this would happen,” says Britt, giggling like a schoolgirl. She’s about to turn 102-year...

An historic school built for African Americans in 1925 is restored and reopened in St. George, S.C. as a community center and museum. It will share the stories of those who created it and were educated there.

Painted bright white with a red, tin roof, the St. George Rosenwald school in Dorchester County looks new. Inside, former student Clara Britt is excited to sit behind a small, wooden desk again.

“I never thought that this would happen,” says Britt, giggling like a schoolgirl. She’s about to turn 102-years-old.

Sitting beside Britt is former classmate Ordie Brown. He’s 94-years-old and met his wife here.

“She was taking home economics,” says Brown. “They were practicing how to cook. She would give me lunch out the window.”

Brown and Britt are reunited for the reopening of the historic St. George school. After years of fundraising, planning and construction, the restored schoolhouse will now serve as a community center and museum, sharing the story of African Americans denied an education and the hope they found in schools like St. George Rosenwald.

Built in 1925, the schoolhouse is known as a Rosenwald school because it was funded in part by Julius Rosenwald. He was the son of Jewish immigrants who became the president of Sears, Roebuck and Company.

Rosenwald met educator Booker T. Washington in 1911. The founder of the Tuskegee Institute believed education was the key to African Americans breaking free from generations of oppression.

Together, the wealthy business owner and the educator born into slavery, set out to build schools for Black children.

At the time, 90% of African Americans lived in the South. Yet, schools for Blacks were just shacks with merely a fraction of the funding as White schools, if they existed at all.

Rosenwald offered to match funding in Black communities that raised money for schools and got the support of local white schoolboards. The idea was to get communities to work together.

Black families, already paying taxes for white schools, struggled, but came up with the money. They knew education could be life changing.

“If you’re a parent who can’t read or write, you want your kids to be able to that,” says former state Sen. John Matthews.

Matthews is grateful for the education he received at a Rosenwald school in Bowen, S.C. He helped raise money for the St. George restoration.

Between 1917 and 1932, roughly 5,000 Rosenwald schools were built, educating more than 600,000 Black children. Their graduates include civil right activists like Medgar Evers, John Lewis, and Maya Angelou.

Today, 500 Rosenwald schoolhouses remain but many are in disrepair. Former students like Ralph James want to save them.

“We see the progress, that in spite of these things, we tell the story of how persons made it,” says James. “How they were successful in life.”

A retired municipal judge, James attended the St. George school until it closed in 1954. He’s made it his mission to resurrect the schoolhouse and proudly gave a tour during its reopening earlier this month.

James says the six-teacher schoolhouse is one of the largest in the state, repurposed with electricity and bathrooms, amenities that did not exist when he was a student. He points to potbelly stoves and brick chimneys that warmed children who often had to walk miles because there were no school buses for Black children. And, like most Rosenwald schools, the building features tall windows with classrooms strategically placed.

“Because they had no light, they had no power and they didn’t want shadows on their desks,” explains Micah Thompson with the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, which helped with the restoration.

Congressman Jim Clyburn joined the tour as a special guest during the reopening. His late wife graduated from a Rosenwald School. He said preserving them pays tribute.

“Making sure that we honor the blood, sweat and tears of those who made this community what it is today.”

The congressman helped celebrate Brown and Britt as members of the school’s first graduating class. Brown spoke about playing basketball for the school with the team making a big tournament. But they’d only played on a dirt court.

“We went to the white high school and asked to practice on a wood floor,” said Brown. “But we were told no.”

Britt, meantime, was smitten with Clyburn.

“I had no idea I would ever meet you,” she said.

But Britt took issue with a banner that read she and Brown graduated in 1950.

“Our class is the class of 49. So, I would like them to change that sign,” said Britt as a roomful of guests erupted in laughter.

And, who’s going to argue? Britt is known as the student who once rode an ox to school to maintain her perfect attendance.

Rebirth of St. George Rosenwald school preserves history, promises new future

ST. GEORGE — School’s open.This renovated Rosenwald school — one of about 500 in the state, and one of nearly 5,000 in the American South, all constructed between 1913 and 1932 — hosted its first big meeting when members of the board of the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina gathered in the auditorium on Aug. 8.It was an occasion to remember the history of the school, to celebrate its rebirth and to consider its future. Plans already have been laid to partner with the ...

ST. GEORGE — School’s open.

This renovated Rosenwald school — one of about 500 in the state, and one of nearly 5,000 in the American South, all constructed between 1913 and 1932 — hosted its first big meeting when members of the board of the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina gathered in the auditorium on Aug. 8.

It was an occasion to remember the history of the school, to celebrate its rebirth and to consider its future. Plans already have been laid to partner with the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry on establishing a satellite location here, an idea first proposed by Patsy Knight when she was a state representative, and with the Dorchester County Library to furnish the small library room adjacent to the school’s auditorium.

This historic building in rural South Carolina has been restored thanks to a herculean effort by local advocates and financial support received from lawmakers and private sources. Board members of the nonprofit St. George Rosenwald School now hope to build on their success, adding amenities and historical features to the property, securing 3.5 acres of adjacent land to create public green space and more parking, organizing special events and arranging activities for children.

In short, they want this venue to become a community center and, thus, the epicenter of town.

They have supporters:

The project got underway more than a decade ago, led by Ralph James, a former educator and municipal judge who attended the St. George Rosenwald School as a child. Matthews found $65,000 in rural development funding to help the community purchase the property. Charleston-based architect Glenn Keyes was engaged to salvage the water-damaged and badly deteriorated structure.

Money trickled in over the next several years, about $4 million, and little by little the restoration work was accomplished, documented in a series of pictures by Alan Nussbaum, a rheumatologist and amateur photographer. Reeves joined the effort, becoming James’ close collaborator and engaging the interest of other electric cooperative leaders.

An employee of the Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, Micah Thompson, managed to find dozens of old iron-and-wood desks, the kind once used in the school. One or two of them were part of the St. George Rosenwald School’s original furnishings.

Last year, Stephens sponsored an earmark worth $500,000 to help cover costs. This year, he sponsored another for $400,000.

“I’m not stopping, trust me,” he said, referring to his staunch support of the efforts in St. George. “They won’t let me stop.”

James said the main building is ready for public use, but there are still a few pieces of the puzzle to put in place. A train carriage eventually could sit on a short stretch of rail by the school and become a café, as well as a memorial to the late schoolteacher Ezekiel L. Gadson — a poet, singer and disciplinarian who worked as a railway porter before becoming an educator. A current version of the old sweet shop that once was located nearby could entice youths.

An outhouse and shop building behind the school, once was used for vocational training, could soon be renovated and transformed into an exhibit space featuring information about domestic life in the Black community during Jim Crow.

The wooded area just east of the school perhaps could be purchased for the purpose of creating public greenspace, with trails, historical interpretation, an amphitheater and extra parking.

Historic partnership

Clara Dixon Britt, 101, remembered attending the school for third grade and, later, for eighth grade. She’d walk five miles to get there, except on days she could ride an ox.

Ordie Columbus Brown, 94, had to travel farther — 6 miles or so — but often found a ride. His father eventually purchased a small school bus, and a teenage Brown would drive it, full of students from his community, south to the school.

He played on the basketball team, which used a rough-cut court located between the two wings of the building. The team was good, and one year made it to the tournament level. Brown visited the nearby White high school to ask permission for the players to prepare for the tournament by practicing on the high school’s hardwood court. School officials said no.

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Julius Rosenwald was a Chicago-based businessman and the son of immigrant German Jews who became president of Sears Roebuck and Co., the biggest retail store of the early 20th century. Sears sold pretty much everything, and it distributed a thick catalogue through the mail, enabling many Black people forbidden by legalized segregation from shopping in regular White-owned retail stores to purchase all kinds of items, from seeds to lumber to kitchen supplies.

After Rosenwald made his fortune, he became an avid philanthropist. He met Booker T. Washington in 1911, and the two men worked out a plan to build a network of schools for African American children. At the time, the separate-but-equal legal doctrine codified by the Supreme Court in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case resulted in unequal public education. White schools generally were much better funded than Black schools, and the entrenched poverty among African Americans that was a consequence of nearly three centuries of slavery and Jim Crow meant that education was a privilege that not all families could afford.

Rosenwald and Washington changed that. Eventually, the 5,000 Rosenwald schools ensured that about a third of all African American children could receive a quality education. The schools produced a new generation of achievers, setting the stage for the freedom struggle of the 1940s and ’50s, followed by the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

St. George restaurant marries faith, family and food

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible st...

ST. GEORGE — Sweeping the floor following the lunch rush at Nannie’s Kitchen, Sherrie Benson sings along to “It Matters to the Master” by Southern Gospel group The Collingsworth Family.

By the time the small St. George restaurant has closed at 3 p.m., Benson has been hard at work for close to 12 hours, baking off biscuits and muffins in the wee hours of the morning. Later in the early evening on this Monday, she will lead a Bible study at the restaurant she opened with her husband Shane in November 2021. The group of about a dozen women planned to discuss a book titled, “Twelve Extraordinary Women: How God Shaped Women of the Bible, and What He Wants to Do with You.”

Some restaurants feel like they’ve been around for decades, even if they haven’t. Nannie’s Kitchen, located at 307 North Parler Ave. just under one hour from downtown Charleston, is one of those places.

Homegrown knickknacks fill the walls, from coffee mugs to children’s soccer jerseys. By the door, there is a photo of Edna, or Nannie, Benson’s grandmother and the inspiration for the small restaurant. Edna was a praying grandmother who helped get Benson through tough times, she told me after I recently visited Nannie’s for lunch.

After placing my order for the barbecue sandwich with mustard sauce, I turned my attention to the baked goods case, which Benson later told me was decimated from a busy weekend. There was still more than enough to choose from, including apple fritters, blueberry muffins and a chocolate-covered cake pop with a delightfully unexpected strawberry filling. In addition to the baked goods, Nannie’s Kitchen serves breakfast sandwiches, soups, salads, meatloaf, grilled pimento cheese, hot dogs, Hershey’s Ice Cream and more.

Food first connected Sherrie and Shane when they met, but opening a restaurant only became a reality when they moved to St. George from Summerville in 2020. The couple fell in love with the calm streets and friendly neighbors in their new South Carolina home, a place that felt more comfortable than a rapidly developing Summerville.

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