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AC Repair in Cottageville, SC

AC Repair Cottageville, SC

There's nothing quite like a South Carolina summer. On any given day, you can enjoy lazy days near the beaches in Cottageville, memorable outdoor activities with friends, and barbeque sessions that last well into the evening. While South Carolina is known for its beauty, outdoor temperatures begin to heat up in April and, by July, can reach over 100 degrees.

Having a reliable air conditioning system to keep your family cool and comfortable in the summer is a must. Unfortunately, AC systems often require repairs when you need them most. In these situations, you need AC repair in Cottageville, SC, as soon as possible. That's where Atlantis Heating & Air swoops in to save the day with efficient service, effective repairs, and outstanding customer service.

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The Atlantis Heating & Air Difference

When your A/C unit needs repairing, you're probably looking for a trustworthy company with highly-trained technicians, cost-conscious pricing, and unwavering commitment to you - the client.

As a family-operated AC repair company in South Carolina, Atlantis Heating & Air provides that and more. Our highest priority is to do what's best for our customers - no questions asked. By giving our clients honest evaluations, reasonable pricing, and access to AC repair experts, we gain customers for life. We find this approach to be much better than recommending unneeded repairs, charging outrageous prices, or constantly trying to sell you a product.

 Appliance Store Cottageville, SC

At the end of the day, our goal is to make it simple to live comfortably in your home, no matter the month. To achieve that goal, we provide a wide range of A/C repair services:

  • AC Refrigerant Leaks
  • Failed Blower Motor Repair
  • AC Capacitor Repair
  • Clogged Drain Line Repair
  • AC Compressor Repair
  • Evaporator Coil Repair
  • Condenser Coil Repair
  • Clogged or Dirty AC Filter Replacement
  • Much More

What are the Signs You Need AC Repair in Cottageville, SC?

While modern AC units are built to withstand outdoor conditions and years of everyday use, like most machines, repairs are needed eventually. According to a recent poll conducted by Consumer Affairs, air conditioning was reported as the second-most needed home repair in the U.S., just after plumbing systems.

To keep your AC system going strong and to minimize major repairs and HVAC replacements, keep an eye on the following signs.

AC Cycles

Never-Ending AC Cycles

Your AC unit's cooling cycles should come on at relatively routine times. Sure, you can expect your A/C to kick on more often during the hottest months of the year. But if you find that it's cycling on and off all the time, something is probably wrong. If you hear frequent cycles, contact Atlantis today so our team can diagnose your problem. Routine maintenance or a simple AC tune-up may be all you need.

Water Leakage

Water Leakage from AC Unit

When warm air blows over your unit's evaporator coil, it cools down and forms condensation, which you often see on the ground around your unit. This is normal. However, if your condensation drain line is damaged or broken, it can lead to serious water leaks that must be dealt with professionally.

Room Temperatures

Different Room Temperatures

To keep the temperatures in your home uniform, keep your vents open, unobstructed, and clean. Be forewarned, though - if the insulation in your home is poor or you have ductwork in disrepair, opening vents probably won't help much. If you find that to be the case, call Atlantis Heating & Air ASAP so we can get to the bottom of your temperature fluctuations.

Nasty Odors

Nasty Odors

If you smell unpleasant odors and think they are coming from your air conditioning unit, you need to fix the problem before it gets worse. Fortunately, a quick diagnostic test from a professional can tell if your air conditioning system requires a complete tune-up, replacement, and cleaning or if your cooling system needs a further technical overhaul. Ultraviolet (UV) lights can do wonders for killing microbial growth in air conditioning systems. Contact Atlantis Heating & Air to learn more about how our AC experts can eliminate gross odors with AC repair in Cottageville, SC.

Warm Air

Warm Air Instead of Cold

Have you ever been sitting in your living room during a hot South Carolina summer and noticed that your air return vents are pumping out hot air? You aren't alone - this is a common problem that Atlantis AC technicians have seen a thousand times. Despite our experience, we know that these instances can vary. Sometimes, an air filter chance is all you need to remediate the problem. In other circumstances, warm air blowing instead of cold can be a more complex issue. Our team of highly-trained technicians has the tools and repair strategies needed to diagnose and repair these problems, so a replacement isn't needed.

Freezes Over

AC Unit Freezes Over

Have you noticed that your AC unit's evaporator coil is freezing over during the summer months? This is most often caused by low refrigerant levels, a clogged filter, or poor airflow. Regardless of the cause, Atlantis Heating & Air has a cost-conscious solution to frozen evaporator coils.

phone-number843-761-0111

Atlantis Heating & Air Pro Tip

If your evaporator coils aren't clean, take some time to clean them. Your coils won't transfer heat correctly when covered with debris and dirt. Dirty coils can lead to all kinds of problems, from higher energy consumption to the system overheating and the compressor failing.

Are These AC Unit Noises Normal?

It doesn't have to be the Halloween season to hear scary sounds coming out of your home's AC unit. If your air conditioner seems like it's possessed, chances are it's trying to tell you it might need maintenance or repair. Keep your ears perked for these common noises that may mean you need AC repair in Cottageville, SC.

Hissing Noises

If you hear a hissing noise coming from your AC unit, it's probably not coming from a rattlesnake. Most likely, the hissing you're hearing is due to an AC leak. Though usually small, AC leaks can lead to many costly problems that ultimately shorten the lifespan of your HVAC unit. If left unchecked, a leak may lead to full AC replacement. Rather than going that route, contact Atlantis Heating & Air for an inspection. Our technicians will thoroughly examine your unit to spot the leak and make the necessary repairs, so you can carry on with your life.

Banging Noises

Banging noises coming from your AC unit can be disconcerting. If you hear banging noises, you're right to be worried - these sounds can mean a few things, but the typical culprit is a loose spring, screw, or bolt within your unit. In other, more unfortunate circumstances, these noises could mean you're dealing with a broken AC blower or motor. To find out what's going on, it's always best to work with a certified, licensed professional specializing in air conditioning repair.

Screeching Noises

A screeching or high-pitched squealing noise can be downright scary in the middle of the night. If you hear this noise in the summertime, though, chances are it's your AC unit telling you the fan belt is worn out or loose. Alternatively, this noise could mean you have a broken or malfunctioning motor.

What Do I Do If My AC Unit Won't Turn On?

When hot summer temperatures are in full swing in South Carolina, most residents turn to their air conditioners to cool down and relax. Could you imagine coming home from a hard day's work in the middle of July, only to find your house is hotter inside than it is outside? When your A/C unit doesn't turn on, it's not just a matter of sweaty inconvenience - it's a matter of health and safety. Without reliable cool air to keep your house comfortable, you could suffer from heat exhaustion or worse.

So, if your air conditioning unit won't turn on, what should you do? Consider these helpful troubleshooting tricks:

  • Ensure Your Thermostat is on Cool
  • Check Your Circuit Breaker Panel for Trips
  • Check Your System's Power Switches
  • See if Air Filter is Dirty or Clogged
  • Remove Any Dirt and Debris from Outside

Have you tried these tips and tricks with little or no success? It might be time to bring in the pros. contacting a trustworthy HVAC maintenance company like Atlantis for AC repair in Cottageville, SC, is often the quickest and most effective way to fix a malfunctioning air conditioner.

 Appliance Repair Store Cottageville, SC

Try These Tips to Save Money and Energy

Summers in South Carolina mean rising temperatures and, by proxy, higher electric bills. If you're like us, you don't want to pay any more than you have to. Fortunately, at Atlantis Heating & Air, we know a thing or two about saving energy. Try these easy tips and tricks to save money and energy this summer.

Protect Your AC Unit

While your HVAC unit is built to be outside, constant sun exposure shortens its lifespan and ability to function optimally. Consider installing an awning or planting a tree or bush near your unit to give it shade from the sun. Keep in mind, though, that trees and bushes shed leaves and other debris that can clog your unit. Be sure to select a bush or tree that doesn't shed much.

Invest in a Programmable Thermostat

Programmable thermostats give you complete control of your HVAC unit, even when you're not home. This allows you to set a schedule that accounts for your usage habits to reduce unnecessary AC power use. For example, if the whole family is away from home all day, your thermostat raises the temperature and only starts to lower it when people get home. You can save a lot of energy by not turning on the AC power when no one is in the house.

Think About Replacing Your Unit

At first glance, the cost of replacing an A/C system might seem incredibly expensive. However, if your hardware is older, the ROI you get on a new unit may happen quicker than you think.

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How Do I Know When It's Time to Replace My AC Unit?

Your HVAC system is one of the most expensive and important appliances in your house, so it's important to make sure it's running well. A poorly functioning HVAC system can drive up utility costs and cause you to spend money on repairs. While minor repairs are commonplace, it's wise to think about how often your unit needs repairs and how serious they seem. If AC repair in Cottageville, SC, has run its course, it may be time to replace your AC unit. Here are some of the most common signs that it's time to do so.

Your AC System Runs Longer and More Often

An old and exhausted system takes longer to reach the intended temperature because it has to work harder than a new system. After several years of use, coils and motors can no longer operate at full capacity. They often take longer to produce desired temperatures and may not be able to circulate air as efficiently or effectively. Occasionally, replacing individual parts may extend the system's life; however, if you notice difficulty reaching certain temperatures or an increase in running time, it may be time to replace the system entirely.

You're Paying for Frequent Repairs or Replacements

No matter the quality or how much you pay for your A/C unit, it's going to need maintenance and repairs from time to time. The parts that make up your HVAC system - coils, filters, motors, and fans - can be worn or damaged, which affects your AC system's efficiency. While this is natural for air conditioning systems, needing frequent repairs is a red flag. If repairs and replacements are becoming more frequent, it's often a sign that it would make more financial sense to replace the entire system.

Your AC Unit is Old

If your AC system is more than 10 years old, the technology is likely outdated and far less efficient than modern equipment. Also, after 10 years, most older equipment starts to lose efficiency and have performance issues. Even a well-maintained system wears out after a decade or more of ongoing use. If your system is just too old to perform like it used to, a newer, more efficient heating and cooling system makes sense to consider.

 Appliances Cottageville, SC

Atlantis Heating & Air Pro Tip

Regardless of the type or brand of cooling system you have in your home, proper maintenance is essential for operation and efficiency. Make sure each unit is cleaned regularly, worn parts are replaced, and your system is checked annually by a professional. This can greatly help save costs and extend the life of the system.

Free Consultation

Choose Atlantis Heating & Air for Unmatched AC Repair in Cottageville, SC

When you need a reliable AC repair company that offers high-quality service at a price you can afford, nobody is better suited to serve you than Atlantis Heating & Air. From simple A/C system checks to evaporator coil replacements and everything in between, your comfort and peace of mind is our bread and butter. No tricky fine print. No unnecessary services. Only exceptional A/C repair for your family. Contact our office today to learn more about our company or to schedule a quick and easy evaluation today.

phone-number843-761-0111

Latest News in Cottageville, SC

Large tornado spotted west of Cottageville headed toward Summerville

Damage reports from a tornado spotted west of Summerville early Monday morning still coming in, but it appears no fatalities have been reported.A tornado warding has since expired, but according to The National Weather Service in Charleston at 7 a.m. a confirmed large and extremely dangerous tornado was located just west of Cottageville, moving east at 50 mph.Emergency dispatchers reported many downed trees and some power outages west of Summerville in the Jedburg area. Fire alarms also have been reported, but no fire damage ha...

Damage reports from a tornado spotted west of Summerville early Monday morning still coming in, but it appears no fatalities have been reported.

A tornado warding has since expired, but according to The National Weather Service in Charleston at 7 a.m. a confirmed large and extremely dangerous tornado was located just west of Cottageville, moving east at 50 mph.

Emergency dispatchers reported many downed trees and some power outages west of Summerville in the Jedburg area. Fire alarms also have been reported, but no fire damage has yet been reported.

This is a developing story.

The play “Curtains” closed their 46th season on June 4, but Flowertown Players already have their 47th season of shows laid out.

Their board is excited to have new Managing Director Kendall Kiker on staff. He had spent most of his career as an educator, teaching at schools in South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi and Texas. Kendall most recently directed productions of “She Kills Monsters” and “The Spitfire Grill, The Musical” at Coker University in Hartsville. He can be seen in films such as “American Made” with Tom Cruise and “The Founder” with Michael Keaton. Kiker is an at-large board member and chair of the Playwriting Committee for the South Carolina Theatre Association.

In addition to Kiker, the Flowertown Players has added Jason Olson as its Artistic Director/Tech Director. I profiled Olson back in February about “behind-the-scenes” theatre work (rb.gy/pxb7t). Jason also is a writer as his adaptation of “The Three Musketeers” was produced there in 2014. Olson’s work has frequently been showcased at the South of Broadway Theatre’s annual Playfest and through 5th Wall Productions which he co-founded and where he currently also serves as executive director and literary manager.

Regan: Kendall, your background?

Kiker: I grew up in Darlington. I got a BA in Theatre Arts from Francis Marion University, an MFA in Acting from the University of Southern Mississippi, and will begin work on a MA in Arts Administration at Winthrop University in August. In high school, I got roped into auditioning for “The King & I.” I got cast and was absolutely hooked — was a little hesitant and a bit nervous. I’ve been teaching, directing and acting ever since!

R: Jason, you’re the new artistic director, but you’re still the tech director, too?

Olson: Yes, I’ve recently taken over the full-time artistic responsibilities and will continue with the technical aspects as well.

R: Thoughts on the last season? How does the theatre choose the plays?

O: This season had some challenges, but we came through it. It was a profitable season. We got a lot of people to return after COVID-19, (the theatregoers and the actors), so we consider that a success, which is very encouraging.

For Season 47, the works were chosen by a play-reading committee of board members, volunteers and theatre professionals. Future seasons will be chosen from the play-reading committee, director submissions and what audiences want to see. The main stage, which has the main five plays, will typically be established, fan-favorite types. We also have productions in the studio which is the rear building where we will do newer, perhaps more edgier plays. We are going to introduce monthly staged readings of new work. We will also use that space for what should be a pretty robust set of educational programs starting in August.

R: Your youth educational program?

O: We have an education committee of board members, instructors, educators and parents. Kendall and I are also on it. We will oversee creating a new curriculum, including educational opportunities for folks young and old. We are doing a kid’s summer camp and “101 Dalmatians” is the kid’s version for their play and that will be performed from July 21-23. The camp registration’s deadline is June 30. Parents can go on our website to sign their kids up. There are a few education members on this committee, and we will look at going to area schools to do theatrical outreach perhaps in the next year or so.

R: Kendall, have you held this type of position before?

K: I’ve had similar roles wrapped into teaching positions before. I want to see that we can continue to develop talent for the Summerville area and continue to create quality theatre that this community is going to want to see and talk about and, hopefully, participate in.

R: Input from theatregoers?

O: People are excited about the new season. There is a little something for everyone. We’ve already seen a growth in our season memberships. The committee and the board did a good job at selecting our plays this past year. The same type of effort will go into future seasons. We will do another artistic survey once this next year’s season gets going to hear from the community about the type of plays they want to see.

R: What are you most proud of about Flowertown Players?

O: I think what makes us stand out from a lot of the other theaters is that the backbone of this theater is the volunteers. They make or break this theater. We’ve seen such an increase in both the support and acting sides that we are really going to be even more successful based on just the recent influx of volunteer interest. It all comes back to COVID having slowed everything down. We are in a rebuilding phase now, so we’re on the upswing!

K: Jason’s been here, on and off, for 11 years and I’ve just wrapped up my third week here! We both have our own unique perspectives. For me, I’m really excited by how positive everyone is and how forward-moving everything is as everyone has a great vision of where we are going. We are all working together to move in that direction, so I am excited about being a part of that type of supportive environment.

For more information, visit www.FlowertownPlayers.org. Click the “Get Involved” tab to sign up to audition, volunteer or support the group. They accept donations online and plan to form more corporate sponsorships. To learn more about that, contact Managing Director Kendall Kiker at MD@FlowertownPlayers.org.

Flowertown Players kicks off its next season Aug 11 with “Ruthless, The Musical!”

Columnist Mary E. Regan is a freelance publicist with her ProPublicist.com consultancy. Seeking new publicity clients and writing projects. Story ideas? Email: Mary@ProPublicist.com.

Former Colleton County Councilman, Reverend Evon Robinson, Sr., to Serve as MLK Parade Marshal

Written by: Anna S. BrightSubmitted by: Herman G. Bright, Parade ChairmanPhoto: SubmittedFor 35 years, the Walterboro Shrine Club of Arabian Temple #139 has sponsored the town’s parade, honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As a nation, we honor this slain civil rights leader whose mission was to advocate for all people who had been oppressed by unjust laws and immoral abuses. King vowed, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Serving this year as parade marshal is...

Written by: Anna S. Bright

Submitted by: Herman G. Bright, Parade Chairman

Photo: Submitted

For 35 years, the Walterboro Shrine Club of Arabian Temple #139 has sponsored the town’s parade, honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As a nation, we honor this slain civil rights leader whose mission was to advocate for all people who had been oppressed by unjust laws and immoral abuses. King vowed, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Serving this year as parade marshal is a former Colleton County Councilman and retired pastor, Rev. Evon Arrington Robinson, Sr. When given the invitation to serve as this year’s marshal, Rev. Robinson expressed many words of gratitude and was most elated to accept this honor. Due to COVID restrictions, the parade was not held in 2021, and it was not held in 2022 because of inclement weather.

Rev. Robinson, a retired pastor of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, is a native of Cottageville, South Carolina. He is the son of the late Mr. Easley Robinson, Sr., and Mrs. Bula Mae Haynes Robinson. After graduating from Colleton Training School, he attended SC Trade School and later completed a tour of duty in the United States Army. In 1970 he received the call to ministry. He attended South Carolina State University, subsequently attending the Nichols Theological Seminary Extension in Charleston, South Carolina for religious training.

Having served in the pastoral ministry of Jesus Christ for 47 years, all of which were in the South Carolina Annual Conference, among his assignments were the Fairfax, St. Paul, Holly Hill, St. Matthew, and St. Stephens Circuits. Rev. Robinson led the Greater St. Paul and Greater Target congregations in the construction of brand-new edifices. In addition, he led the congregations at St. Peters, New Hope, St. Matthew, and St. Stephens in total renovation projects.

Rev. Robinson served the SC Conference in the following capacities: the Board of Examiners, the Ministerial Efficiency Committee, Presiding Elders’ Salary Committee, the Conference Finance Committee, Chairman of the Finance Committee for the Beaufort District, Station and Circuit Committee, Deeds and Abstracts Committee, and Abandoned Property Committee. Further, he was one of the initial organizers of the Sons of Allen Ministry and served on this committee for many years.

His ministry outside the walls of the church includes being elected to the Colleton County Board of Education. During Rev. Robinson’s tenure while serving as the board chairman, he led the historic event of hiring the first African American superintendent in the county. He was later elected and served on the Colleton County Council for 16 years, three of which he was a chairman. He served for 15 years on the Board of Directors of the Lowcountry Regional Council of Government, and he also served as treasurer for the South Carolina Coalition of Black County Officials. In addition, he served on the Lowcountry Community Action Agency Community Action Agency Board of Directors for several years, four of which he was chairman.

Previously, he was chairman of the Equal Opportunity Committee for the Department of the United States Navy, Naval Weapons Station, Charleston for 12 years, and as the president of the American Federation of Government Employees Union-Local 2298, for two years. Lastly, he is a member of the Colleton Branch of the NAACP and the Hiram Mann Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., of which four years he was the president.

For 57 years Rev. Robinson and his wife, Gloria Smalls Robinson, have been united as one. They are the proud parents of four children: Evon, Jr., Ronald, Rhonda Lynn, and Keon. They have been blessed with nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. After 28 years of service, Rev. Robinson retired from the Naval Weapons Station in Charleston in 1995. In addition, he owned and operated Robinson’s Barbershop in Walterboro for many years.

After having served more than four decades as a pastor in the A.M.E. Church, in November 2018, Rev. Robinson retired from active ministry, a calling of which he loved so dearly. He plans to travel extensively throughout the nation to share his experiences as a servant of God in the wider ecumenical circles, as well as his beloved A.M.E. Church.

The Walterboro Shrine Club’s Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade will take place on Sunday, January 15, 2023, at 2:30 p.m. on Jefferies Boulevard. At 1:30 p.m., the lineup will begin in front of Live Oak Cemetery. The public is cordially invited and encouraged to attend.

Where to see Christmas lights in the Charleston area

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Grab a cup of hot chocolate and turn the Christmas tunes on the radio – there are several options for checking out Christmas lights beyond your neighborhood.Enjoy a night with friends and family as you drive through bright shining lights on display in Moncks Corner, North Charleston, Cottageville, and the largest drive-thru holiday light event at James Island County Park. ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Grab a cup of hot chocolate and turn the Christmas tunes on the radio – there are several options for checking out Christmas lights beyond your neighborhood.

Enjoy a night with friends and family as you drive through bright shining lights on display in Moncks Corner, North Charleston, Cottageville, and the largest drive-thru holiday light event at James Island County Park.

Holiday Festival of Lights – James Island County Park871 Riverland Dr, Charleston

A trip to the Holiday Festival of Lights at James Island County Park is a Christmas-time tradition filled with thousands of dazzling lights and displays.

Guests are invited to drive along a three-mile stretch lined with more than 700 light displays each night through December 31. A stop at Winter Wonderland – about halfway through the drive – gives you an opportunity to stretch your legs and view the area’s largest holiday sand sculpture.

You can view shops, search for gifts, or enjoy sweet treats or a cup of hot chocolate. Hop on a train ride for a fun look at light displays or take a stroll through the Enchanted Walking Trail for a fun look at nature-themed light displays.

Santa Claus will meet children each night from November 21 – December 23. Plus, enjoy an array of large greeting cards decorated by students from across the Charleston area.

Ticket prices on a regular night will cost $15 per vehicle if purchased online at HolidayFestivalofLights.com or $20 at the gate. Peak night prices increase to $25 per vehicle online and $30 at the gate.

The 33rd Annual Holiday Festival of Lights is open every evening from November 11 through December 31 from 5:30 p.m. until 10:00 p.m.

The Lights at Park Circle4800 Park Circle, North Charleston

Pack up the car and take a drive or go for a relaxing stroll around North Charleston’s Park Circle to see dozens of Christmas light displays.

Trees, lights, and displays will be shining bright around the circle at the Felix C. Davis Community Center.

City leaders say the lights will shine until New Year’s Day. There is no fee to enjoy the lights.

Bee City Zoo’s Christmas Wonderland of Lights1066 Holly Ridge Ln. Cottageville, SC 29435

On select nights in November and December, guests can enjoy a combination of animals and Christmas lights at Bee City Zoo’s Christmas Wonderland of Lights festival.

Santa Claus will make a special appearance during some nights of the event for a photo opportunity.

Those attending can also attend an ‘Australian Walkabout’ which is included in the price of admission. And for some additional costs, you can enjoy roasting s’mores, ornament decorating, grabbing a cup of hot chocolate, or feeding animals during the festival.

Admission is $12 or you can purchase a combo pass which includes day access to the zoo and entry to the lights at $20. Click here to learn more.

Holiday Lights Driving Tour – Old Santee Canal Park900 Stoney Landing Rd, Moncks Corner

Celebrate the season with family and friends on a driving tour filled with sparkling Christmas lights and displays at Old Santee Canal Park powered by Santee Cooper.

The event runs each night from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. from November 25 – December 30. It will be closed on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

Admission to the event is $5 per vehicle. Proceeds benefit local charities.

Guests will enter the Holiday Lights Driving Tour at 1 Riverwood Drive in Moncks Corner.

“The beautiful LED lighting displays are powered by 100% Santee Cooper Green Power, which is Green-e Energy certified and meets the environmental and consumer-protection standards set forth by the nonprofit Center for Resource Solutions,” organizers said.

Santee Cooper is also inviting guests to attend its two-night event ‘Holiday in the Park’ on November 24 and 25. You’ll have the chance to meet Santa Claus, enjoy crafts, roast marshmallows, and sample some seasonal foods.

“This event is included with admission to Holiday Lights Driving Tour, which runs through Dec. 30, so you can start your holiday season early at this fun-filled meetup,” said organizers.

To learn more or purchase tickets online, please click here.

Cougar Night Lights – The College of CharlestonNear the corner of George and St. Philip Streets

A holiday tradition that brings a fun and dazzling light show to the College of Charleston’s Cistern Yard and Randolph Hall will light up with the spirit of the season each night, offering a holiday light show featuring festive music and visual performances each half-hour from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.

The display will be open to the public beginning December 1 through January 2. It is free to view and this year’s show will include new music and lighting displays.

Visitors can find the Cistern Yard at the corner of George and St. Philip Streets. Public parking garages are available at two nearby locations – the George Street Garage and the St. Philip Street Garage.

Did we miss something? Email us with details about a local Christmas light show.

Septic tank drama may shutter Cottageville restaurant

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In ...

COTTAGEVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – A problem with a septic tank may force a small business in Colleton County to close its doors for good.

David Stanfield and his wife opened Red Brick Pizza in Cottageville a few years ago. But they may have to close their business after South Carolina’s lead health agency, the Department of Health and Environmental Control, said their septic system is not fit for the job.

“Almost two years ago we started, and almost immediately DHEC jumped on my back,” said Stanfield. “In March of last year, we started takeout only, but in March I contacted them about opening a 12-person dining room. They said yes, you can open it.”

A month later, Stanfield said he was told that could not have a dining room.

“I asked them about the tables out front – I had four picnic tables out front – they said you can have all the picnic tables you want, so we built a patio which has a bunch of outside tables. And then five months later, during another inspection, and we’ve gone through eight in one year, during another inspection they said you can’t have these outside tables. I said, well, you told us we could.”

DHEC told Stanfield that his septic tank was too small, and he was given a ‘shut door’ order.

“Two months ago, I went before the council- I begged them, I said my septic system has never overflowed, it’s never had a problem, and they said you have 60 days to put this monstrosity in back here.”

His customers were outside protesting on Tuesday while raising money to help keep them in business.

Stanfield began installing the large septic system. He says he has now spent $51,000 on the project. But his business only makes about $800-$1,000 on a good week. So, he believes he will now have to just shut down.

Stanfield eventually put a water meter on his property after a suggestion from a neighbor to see how much water was being used each day.

“Our water meter shows that we use 350 gallons per night, my existing system will do 450 gallons and they’ve got me putting in the system it will do 1,500 gallons per night which is just crazy. They’ve bankrupted me. They’ve taken every dime that we have, and we don’t even have money to open for food this week.”

DHEC sent News 2 a statement saying Stanfield was not in compliance with his DHEC permit when he moved from take-out only to restaurant seating.

“Mr. Stanfield did not dispute the grounds for suspension but requested the suspension be rescinded because he was diligently working on gaining compliance with DHEC regulations,” the statement said. “Failure to install the upgraded system would not lead to closure of the facility but would result in the return to the original food service operation as approved and permitted by DHEC.”

“I don’t understand this because, you know, America is known for if you put everything into – whatever your dream is – you can get it accomplished and they are burying us alive,” said Heike Stanfield, Co-Owner, Red Brick Pizza.

Stanfield said they were last open on Saturday. But unless a miracle happens, he believes they may not be able to re-open again.

The matter was discussed during a DHEC board meeting on May 5, 2022 with the restaurant’s owner in attendance – a motion was made about two hours and thirty-three minutes into the meeting, following an executive session. You can watch that hearing by clicking here.

SC Highway Patrol trooper accused of biting 2-year-old, SLED says

A South Carolina highway trooper was arrested and charged with cruelty to children after he allegedly bit a 2-year-old’s cheek hard enough to leave a mark, according to the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division.SLED announced the arrest in a statement Tuesday. While the warrant provides few details, it states that Jesse Brassell, 23, admitted on Sept. 20 that he intentionally bit the child’s cheek in Cottageville, South Carolina.In...

A South Carolina highway trooper was arrested and charged with cruelty to children after he allegedly bit a 2-year-old’s cheek hard enough to leave a mark, according to the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division.

SLED announced the arrest in a statement Tuesday. While the warrant provides few details, it states that Jesse Brassell, 23, admitted on Sept. 20 that he intentionally bit the child’s cheek in Cottageville, South Carolina.

In a statement, SLED said the Colleton County Sheriff’s Office asked it to investigate the incident. The child, whose name and gender are not included in the warrant, suffered a bite mark on the right cheek, according to the warrant.

Brassell was employed by the Highway Patrol for approximately 27 months, according to a statement from the Department of Public Safety, which oversees highway patrol.

“He had been under suspension without pay since September 22, 2023, the date the allegation was brought to our attention,” according to a statement from the department. Brassell, who held the rank of trooper first class, officially resigned from the agency on Dec. 15, 2023.

During his time as a highway patrolman, Brassell was assigned to Post B of Troop 6, which covers Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester and Jasper counties. A roster for a basic training graduating class released by the Highway Patrol listed his hometown as Summerville, South Carolina.

Brassell was charged under South Carolina’s cruelty to children statute. Under the law, it is a misdemeanor for a parent, guardian or anyone who has “charge or custody” of a child to inflict “unnecessary pain or suffering” or to deprive the child of “necessary sustenance or shelter.”

Brassell was booked at the Colleton County Detention Center. Records from the jail state that he received a $200 bond by Associate Chief Magistrate Sophia T. Henderson.

The case will be prosecuted by the 14th Circuit Solicitor’s Office Public Integrity Unit, according to SLED. The unit, which is a collaboration between the 14th and 1st Circuit Solicitor’s Offices, investigates officer involved shootings, public corruption and other use of force cases across both circuits.

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